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Our scientific advances in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and statistical genetics, as well as the largest database of microbiomes in the world (gathered over five years from hundreds of thousands of people), allow us to create revolutionary clinical products.

 uBiome has eight issued patents and 250 pending patents. We also have 20 papers and presentations from our scientific team written during their tenure at uBiome.

PublicationsBack to top

PUBLICATIONS BY UBIOME STAFF

 
PUBLICATIONS USING UBIOME’S TECHNOLOGIES

Conferences & PresentationsBack to top

Conference Abstracts and Presentations

  • Elisabeth M. Bik, Sara W. Bird, Luis E. Leon, Patricia Vera, Juan A. Ugalde, Daniel E. Almonacid, Jessica Richman, Zachary S. Apte. A new sequencing-based assay combining HPV detection and identification with vaginal microbiome analysis. ASCCP Annual Meeting, April 18-21, 2018, Las Vegas, NV.
  • Elisabeth M. Bik, Sara W. Bird, Ignacio Varas-Concha, Maureen Hitschfeld, Shu Shu Wu, Laurens Kraal, Sarah Gupta, Daniel E. Almonacid, Jessica Richman, Zachary S. Apte Who uses SmartGutTM? An overview of 10,000 selected clinical microbiome test results. Keystone Symposium Microbiome, Host Resistance and Disease, March 4-8. Banff, Alberta, Canada.
  • Rafael Araos, Juan A. Ugalde, Erika D’agata. Microbial disruption indices in the fecal microbiome predicting acquisition of multidrug-resistant organism in nursing homes. Open Forum Infectious Diseases (Vol 4). Abstract presented in IDWeek 2017, October 4-8th. San Diego, CA. USA.
  • Melissa Alegría-Arcos, Valeria Marquez-Miranda, Ingrid Araya Duran, Fernando Gonzalez-Nilo, Jessica Richman, Zachary S Apte, Daniel E Almonacid. Reengineering of TLR2 modulating peptides from the human microbiota as new drugs for metabolic diseases. XL Annual Meeting of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Society of Chile. September 25-29th 2017, Puerto Varas, Chile.
  • Daniel Almonacid. Defining healthy reference ranges for probiotic taxa in the human gut microbiome. 2017 Meeting International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics. June 27-29th. Chicago, IL, USA.
  • Elisabeth M. Bik. A decade of studies on the human microbiome: challenges and promises
. Maintaining Oral Health: Lessons learned from our microbiota. May 11, 2017. Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • Daniel E. Almonacid, Elisabeth M. Bik, Laurens Kraal, Francisco J. Ossandon, Yelena V. Budovskaya, Juan Pablo Cardenas, Jessica Richman, Zachary S. Apte. Healthy ranges for clinically important microbial taxa in the human gut. Keystone Symposium Microbiome in Health and Disease, February 5-9, 2017. Keystone, CO, USA.
  • Elisabeth M. Bik, Daniel E. Almonacid, Laurens Kraal, Francisco J. Ossandon, Yelena V. Budovskaya, Juan Pablo Cardenas, Jessica Richman, Zachary S. Apte. Reference ranges of 28 clinically important microbial taxa in the healthy human gut. Kisaco Research Human Microbiome Congress. January 24-25, 2017. San Diego, CA, USA.
  • Daniel Almonacid. Sequence similarity networks: Phylogenomics tool for studying sequence relationships across large datasets. XXXVIII Annual Meeting of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Society of Chile. September 22-25, 2015. Puerto Varas, Chile.
  • Zac Apte. Your microbiome and citizen science, science at scale. XXXVIII Annual Meeting of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Society of Chile. September 22-25, 2015. Puerto Varas, Chile.
  • Juan Pablo Cardenas, Daniel Almonacid, Laurens Kraal, Francisco Ossandon, Yelena Budovskaya, Jessica Richman, Zachary Apte. 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing as a Clinical Diagnostic Aid for Gastrointestinal-related conditions. Second ISCB Latin America Student Council Symposium. November 19th, 2016. Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  • Juan Pablo Cárdenas. “La Materia Oscura De La Vida: Desde El Microbioma Humano A Los Extremófilos” (The Dark Matter of Life: From the Human Microbiome to Extremophiles). XVII Congreso Nacional de Estudiantes de Biología. September 6, 2016, Piura, Perú.
  • Jessica Richman. Could a citizen scientist win a Nobel Prize? TEDMed 2013. April 16-19th, 2013. Washington, DC. USA. [http://www.tedmed.com/talks/show?id=54786]
  • Jessica Richman. Citizen Science and the Microbiome. ASM General Meeting. May 18-21st, 2013. Denver, CO, USA.
  • Zachary Apte. Crowdsourcing the Microbiome. 8th International Conference on Genomics (ICG8). October 30 – November 1st, 2013. Shenzhen, China.
  • Two poster presentations at the Chilean Society for Microbiology (Nov 14-17, 2017).
    Rodrigo Ortiz: “Role of the Blautia genus in the modulation of lactose tolerance as a member of the human gut microbiota” Authors: Rodrigo Ortiz, Melissa Alegria, Felipe Melis, Patricia Vera-Wolf, Inti Pedroso, Juan A. Ugalde, José Pérez-Donoso, Daniel Almonacid, Jessica Richman, Zachary Apte.
    Patricia Vera-Wolf: “Signature of the nose microbiome across geographical and temporal changes” Authors: Patricia Vera-Wolf, Luis Leon, Felipe Melis, Rodrigo Ortiz, Daniel Almonacid, Juan A. Ugalde, Jessica Richman, Zachary Apte.
  • Two invited symposium talks at the Chilean Society for Microbiology (Nov 14-17, 2017)
    Elisabeth Bik. A decade of studies on the human microbiome: challenges and promises
    Juan A. Ugalde. Microbial diversity in urban environments: Interactions between humans the built environment

Community outreachBack to top

Community outreach talks

  • Elisabeth M. Bik. Women and their microbes.
    Taste of Science, March 28, 2018, Freewheel Brewing Company, Redwood City.
  • Jessica Richman. Sequence Me: Taking Personal Genomics Mainstream.
    South by SouthWest Conference.
    Date to be determined. 2018. Austin, Texas.
  • Jessica Richman. Breakaway Business Models.
    Harvard Medical School. Precision Medicine 2017 Keynote Talk.
    June 21, 2017. Boston, MA.
  • Jessica Richman. Could a Citizen Scientist win a Nobel Prize?
    TEDMED.COM. TedTalk
    November 1-3, 2017. Palm Springs, CA
  • Jessica Richman. Seizing the Disruptive Opportunity.
    Fortune Brainstorm Health Event.
    November 2, 2016. San Diego, CA.
  • Jessica Richman.
    White House Demo Day.
    August 4, 2015. Washington, VA.
  • Jessica Richman. The Future of Research. Citizen Science!
    TEDXBRUSSELS.EU
    November 1, 2013. Brussels, Belgium
  • Jessica Richman. Sequencing the Human Microbiome with Citizen Science.
    Singularity University Executive Program. Metrogenomics Talk.
    May 13, 2013. Moffett Field, CA
  • Elisabeth M. Bik. The human microbiome: 
Our friends for life. (1) Taste of Science: Science Without the Jargon. October 12, 2017. San Francisco, CA, USA. (2) CalTech Pomona. January 5, 2017. Pomona, CA, USA. (3) November 10, 2016. California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • Catalina Valdivia. ”Estudiando el microbioma con herramientas informáticas y ciencia ciudadana” (Studying the microbiome with informatics tools and citizen science): Penta UC, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. June 2, 2017. Macul, Chile.
  • Ricardo Castro. “Inteligencia Artificial en Biología” (Artificial Intelligence in Biology): San Juan Bautista School. October 6, 2017. Ñuñoa, Santiago, Chile.
  • Katia Soto, Araceli Cruz, Janet Torres. “Mi universo bacteriano” (My bacterial universe): (1) Manuel Bulnes Prieto Public School. October 19, 2017. Renca, Santiago, Chile. (2) Madre Bernarda Morín Public Preschool. August 28, 2017. Providencia, Santiago, Chile. (3) Abelardo Iturriaga Jamett Public Preschool for children with Language Disorders. August 8, 2017. Providencia, Santiago, Chile. (4) Cultural Center of Conchalí. June 29, 2017. Conchalí, Santiago, Chile.
  • Harold Nuñez. Microbiology articles at ChileCientifico.com: (1) Microbiota, desarrollo y crecimiento (Microbiota, development and growth), May 29, 2017. (2) Resistencia bacteriana a los antibióticos (Bacterial resistance to antibiotics), July 11, 2017. (3) Las bacterias del cielo (Bacteria from the sky), September 7, 2017. (4) Las bacterias me controlan (Bacteria control me), October 24, 2017.

PressBack to top

Press releases

FAQs

  • Probiotic Foods: The Good Bugs

    When you think of gut health, your mind may jump straight to the word “probiotic.” This isn’t surprising; a Google Trend Report indicated that consumer demand for probiotics has increased significantly since 2004.

    Additionally, since the mid-1990s, research has suggested that probiotics may “aid digestion and help maintain gut health.”

     

    What are probiotics?

    The World Health Organization defines probiotics as “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host.”  

    According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, probiotics may help your body find the proper balance of microorganisms and “stabilize the digestive tract’s barriers against undesirable microorganisms.”

     

    Probiotic Foods

    Probiotics aren’t only available in supplement form. Many delicious foods are naturally full of probiotics!

    Yogurt, for example, is produced when a starter culture of bacteria – usually Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus –  is added to milk. The bacteria break down the lactose sugars into lactic acid.

    Pickling is a time tested technique for preserving vegetables and fruits. While pickling can involve immersing produce in vinegar to kill all the bacteria, a similar outcome can result from immersing produce in salted water for several weeks. In that briny environment, the Lactobacillus bacteria that naturally occurs on produce like cucumbers have a chance to produce lactic acid, which serves as a preservative.

    Another common category of probiotic-rich foods is fermented foods. Foods ferment when molds, yeasts, or bacteria produce enzymes that break down the food into smaller, simpler compounds. The fermented foods are often abundant in probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Pediococcus, and Weisella.

    Probiotic-rich foods include:

    • Yogurt
    • Pickles
    • Sauerkraut
    • Kimchi
    • Kombucha
    • Miso
    • Kvass
    • Cottage cheese
    • Many more!

     

    Curious if the probiotic bacteria in the food you’re eating is making its way to your gut?

    Explorer™ identifies microbes found in the most common probiotic foods and lets you see how your levels of these microbes compare to others who consume these foods.

     

    Use the code UNLEASH at checkout to get 50% off a Gut Explorer kit through the end of February 2019.

    If you’ve used Explorer and have a story to tell, we’d love to hear from you! Share your story on social tagging @ubiome and #UnleashYourExplorer. You’ll be entered for the chance to win 1 Gut Explorer kit each week during February and for the Grand Prize Drawing: a Gut Time Lapse set.*

    *All posts must tag @uBiome and use #UnleashYourExplorer to be counted as a valid entry. The first weekly contest will run Friday 2/1 to Thursday 2/14. Entries must be received by 11:59pm PST on Thursday 2/1. The Grand Prize contest will run Friday 2/1 – Thursday 2/28.  Entries must be received by 11:59 PST on Thursday 2/28 for the Grand Prize. Weekly winners will be announced at 10:00am PST on Friday 2/15. The Grand Prize winner will be announced by 10:00am PST on 3/1/2019.
  • Probiotic Foods: The Good Bugs

    When you think of gut health, your mind may jump straight to the word “probiotic.” This isn’t surprising; a Google Trend Report indicated that consumer demand for probiotics has increased significantly since 2004.

    Additionally, since the mid-1990s, research has suggested that probiotics may “aid digestion and help maintain gut health.”

     

    What are probiotics?

    The World Health Organization defines probiotics as “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host.”  

    According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, probiotics may help your body find the proper balance of microorganisms and “stabilize the digestive tract’s barriers against undesirable microorganisms.”

     

    Probiotic Foods

    Probiotics aren’t only available in supplement form. Many delicious foods are naturally full of probiotics!

    Yogurt, for example, is produced when a starter culture of bacteria – usually Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus –  is added to milk. The bacteria break down the lactose sugars into lactic acid.

    Pickling is a time tested technique for preserving vegetables and fruits. While pickling can involve immersing produce in vinegar to kill all the bacteria, a similar outcome can result from immersing produce in salted water for several weeks. In that briny environment, the Lactobacillus bacteria that naturally occurs on produce like cucumbers have a chance to produce lactic acid, which serves as a preservative.

    Another common category of probiotic-rich foods is fermented foods. Foods ferment when molds, yeasts, or bacteria produce enzymes that break down the food into smaller, simpler compounds. The fermented foods are often abundant in probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Pediococcus, and Weisella.

    Probiotic-rich foods include:

    • Yogurt
    • Pickles
    • Sauerkraut
    • Kimchi
    • Kombucha
    • Miso
    • Kvass
    • Cottage cheese
    • Many more!

     

    Curious if the probiotic bacteria in the food you’re eating is making its way to your gut?

    Explorer™ identifies microbes found in the most common probiotic foods and lets you see how your levels of these microbes compare to others who consume these foods.

     

    Use the code UNLEASH at checkout to get 50% off a Gut Explorer kit through the end of February 2019.

    If you’ve used Explorer and have a story to tell, we’d love to hear from you! Share your story on social tagging @ubiome and #UnleashYourExplorer. You’ll be entered for the chance to win 1 Gut Explorer kit each week during February and for the Grand Prize Drawing: a Gut Time Lapse set.*

    *All posts must tag @uBiome and use #UnleashYourExplorer to be counted as a valid entry. The first weekly contest will run Friday 2/1 to Thursday 2/14. Entries must be received by 11:59pm PST on Thursday 2/1. The Grand Prize contest will run Friday 2/1 – Thursday 2/28.  Entries must be received by 11:59 PST on Thursday 2/28 for the Grand Prize. Weekly winners will be announced at 10:00am PST on Friday 2/15. The Grand Prize winner will be announced by 10:00am PST on 3/1/2019.
  • Probiotic Foods: The Good Bugs

    When you think of gut health, your mind may jump straight to the word “probiotic.” This isn’t surprising; a Google Trend Report indicated that consumer demand for probiotics has increased significantly since 2004.

    Additionally, since the mid-1990s, research has suggested that probiotics may “aid digestion and help maintain gut health.”

     

    What are probiotics?

    The World Health Organization defines probiotics as “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host.”  

    According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, probiotics may help your body find the proper balance of microorganisms and “stabilize the digestive tract’s barriers against undesirable microorganisms.”

     

    Probiotic Foods

    Probiotics aren’t only available in supplement form. Many delicious foods are naturally full of probiotics!

    Yogurt, for example, is produced when a starter culture of bacteria – usually Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus –  is added to milk. The bacteria break down the lactose sugars into lactic acid.

    Pickling is a time tested technique for preserving vegetables and fruits. While pickling can involve immersing produce in vinegar to kill all the bacteria, a similar outcome can result from immersing produce in salted water for several weeks. In that briny environment, the Lactobacillus bacteria that naturally occurs on produce like cucumbers have a chance to produce lactic acid, which serves as a preservative.

    Another common category of probiotic-rich foods is fermented foods. Foods ferment when molds, yeasts, or bacteria produce enzymes that break down the food into smaller, simpler compounds. The fermented foods are often abundant in probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Pediococcus, and Weisella.

    Probiotic-rich foods include:

    • Yogurt
    • Pickles
    • Sauerkraut
    • Kimchi
    • Kombucha
    • Miso
    • Kvass
    • Cottage cheese
    • Many more!

     

    Curious if the probiotic bacteria in the food you’re eating is making its way to your gut?

    Explorer™ identifies microbes found in the most common probiotic foods and lets you see how your levels of these microbes compare to others who consume these foods.

     

    Use the code UNLEASH at checkout to get 50% off a Gut Explorer kit through the end of February 2019.

    If you’ve used Explorer and have a story to tell, we’d love to hear from you! Share your story on social tagging @ubiome and #UnleashYourExplorer. You’ll be entered for the chance to win 1 Gut Explorer kit each week during February and for the Grand Prize Drawing: a Gut Time Lapse set.*

    *All posts must tag @uBiome and use #UnleashYourExplorer to be counted as a valid entry. The first weekly contest will run Friday 2/1 to Thursday 2/14. Entries must be received by 11:59pm PST on Thursday 2/1. The Grand Prize contest will run Friday 2/1 – Thursday 2/28.  Entries must be received by 11:59 PST on Thursday 2/28 for the Grand Prize. Weekly winners will be announced at 10:00am PST on Friday 2/15. The Grand Prize winner will be announced by 10:00am PST on 3/1/2019.
  • Probiotic Foods: The Good Bugs

    When you think of gut health, your mind may jump straight to the word “probiotic.” This isn’t surprising; a Google Trend Report indicated that consumer demand for probiotics has increased significantly since 2004.

    Additionally, since the mid-1990s, research has suggested that probiotics may “aid digestion and help maintain gut health.”

     

    What are probiotics?

    The World Health Organization defines probiotics as “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host.”  

    According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, probiotics may help your body find the proper balance of microorganisms and “stabilize the digestive tract’s barriers against undesirable microorganisms.”

     

    Probiotic Foods

    Probiotics aren’t only available in supplement form. Many delicious foods are naturally full of probiotics!

    Yogurt, for example, is produced when a starter culture of bacteria – usually Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus –  is added to milk. The bacteria break down the lactose sugars into lactic acid.

    Pickling is a time tested technique for preserving vegetables and fruits. While pickling can involve immersing produce in vinegar to kill all the bacteria, a similar outcome can result from immersing produce in salted water for several weeks. In that briny environment, the Lactobacillus bacteria that naturally occurs on produce like cucumbers have a chance to produce lactic acid, which serves as a preservative.

    Another common category of probiotic-rich foods is fermented foods. Foods ferment when molds, yeasts, or bacteria produce enzymes that break down the food into smaller, simpler compounds. The fermented foods are often abundant in probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Pediococcus, and Weisella.

    Probiotic-rich foods include:

    • Yogurt
    • Pickles
    • Sauerkraut
    • Kimchi
    • Kombucha
    • Miso
    • Kvass
    • Cottage cheese
    • Many more!

     

    Curious if the probiotic bacteria in the food you’re eating is making its way to your gut?

    Explorer™ identifies microbes found in the most common probiotic foods and lets you see how your levels of these microbes compare to others who consume these foods.

     

    Use the code UNLEASH at checkout to get 50% off a Gut Explorer kit through the end of February 2019.

    If you’ve used Explorer and have a story to tell, we’d love to hear from you! Share your story on social tagging @ubiome and #UnleashYourExplorer. You’ll be entered for the chance to win 1 Gut Explorer kit each week during February and for the Grand Prize Drawing: a Gut Time Lapse set.*

    *All posts must tag @uBiome and use #UnleashYourExplorer to be counted as a valid entry. The first weekly contest will run Friday 2/1 to Thursday 2/14. Entries must be received by 11:59pm PST on Thursday 2/1. The Grand Prize contest will run Friday 2/1 – Thursday 2/28.  Entries must be received by 11:59 PST on Thursday 2/28 for the Grand Prize. Weekly winners will be announced at 10:00am PST on Friday 2/15. The Grand Prize winner will be announced by 10:00am PST on 3/1/2019.